Now a look at some Nissan products.

1989 Nissan S-Cargo

This is a Nissan’s 1989 S-Cargo, a Japanese market van-like thing, produced from 1989 through 1992. It was built on Nissan’s (B11) Sentra chassis and powered by a 1.5-liter engine, with a three-speed automatic. Apparently, it was not originally marketed as a Nissan and sold exclusively through their Nissan Cherry Stores.

1989 Nissan S-Cargo

The porthole window and large sunroof were actually factory options, however, the owner pointed out that the wheels and paint were not. (While cute, the sparkly glitter paint and trim made for messy pictures.)

1989 Nissan S-Cargo

She was nice enough to allow me to photograph the cab. I remember seeing pictures of these in magazines when they were new and thinking how bizarre they looked but today this would fit in quite normally. It may have been a little too ahead of its time.

1981 Datsun 510

This is a 1981 Datsun 510 wagon. What makes this car so amazing? Nothing in particular. I remember seeing these on the roads when they were not that old. So, its superb condition caught my eye.

1981 Datsun 510

Called the Violet in Japan, our Datsun 510 became the Stanza for 1982.

1981 Datsun 510

Its long-time owner noticed I was taking pictures and became enthusiastically accommodating. He was quite proud of his all-original Datsun and rightly so.

1981 Datsun 510

The car was in remarkable condition considering that it’s driven five days a week and hasn’t been professionally restored. He said honks and waves of appreciation are not uncommon.

1981 Datsun 510

It is equipped with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, rated at 88 hp. Remember, this is from the period when some Datsun/Nissan engines, like this one, were using twin spark plugs per cylinder.

1973 Datsun 510

In 1968, the Datsun 510 two-door sedan was introduced in the U.S. and was available through 1973. This is one of those last year examples.

1973 Datsun 510

Photographing this one was more a case of responding to nostalgia than historic significance. This must have been a shockingly simplistic car to the American public when it first arrived in 1968.

1973 Datsun 510

I remember the interiors of early imports being inhospitable and unsophisticated in comparison to the domestics. Within a decade, the Japanese had remedied that.

1973 Datsun 510

This particular specimen has less than 30,400 miles on it, including its original engine and four-speed manual transmission. You may recall Nissan’s IDx concept from 2013, the 510 coupe was reportedly its inspiration.

1963 Datsun L320 pickup

This is a 1963 Datsun 320 pickup. The 320 was produced from 1962 through 1965.

1963 Datsun L320 pickup

Notice the little hole in the center of the bumper. That’s not for a bolt, to affix a license plate. Some of these trucks were started manually with a crank. Seriously.

1963 Datsun L320 pickup

Between 1963 and 1965, the 320s came in two configurations. This one, with the independent box bed, is called L320.

1963 Datsun NL320 pickup

This is a 1963 Datsun NL320 pickup. Its rear has obvious styling differences from the L320 but did you notice the NL320’s cab and bed are one-piece? Marketed as a sports truck, Datsun produced less than 1,000 copies.

1963 Datsun NL320 pickup

Both 320s used the same front and cab design. Even though this is clearly not an original engine, its owner has decided to have some fun and display one of the cranks I referred to, above.


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