This set is of a few Toyota related vehicles.

1985 Toyota Celica GTS convertible

This 1985 Toyota Celica GTS convertible is one of reportedly only 4,445 made that year. This is the last year of the third generation Celica, introduced for 1982.

1985 Toyota Celica GTS convertible

The 1982-83 models had exposed, fold-back headlights, while the 1984-85 models had the hidden, flip-up type. Smoked lenses were a touch I always liked, something that Toyota’s of this era often incorporated.

1985 Toyota Celica GTS convertible

The top conversions were done by who other than American Specialty Cars (ASC), in California. The GT-S included fender flares, upgraded wheels and tires, independent rear suspension and a host of interior upgrades, all of which were sourced from the still genetically-linked Supra. The look was muscular, a purpose-driven design.

1985 Toyota Celica GTS convertible

This was a period during which my view on Japanese cars was improving, rapidly. I was young but could recognize the multiplying effects final build quality could have on design. This car may not be gorgeous but I think it looks purposefully shaped and solid.

1989 Toyota Land Cruiser HD pickup

This may seem an odd choice to include but I’ve always had an admiration for this era of Toyota Land Cruiser and their many configurations. This 1989 heavy-duty pickup is an excellent example.

1989 Toyota Land Cruiser HD pickup

According to the owner, the heavy-duty pickup truck was produced between 1984 and 1990. It had the longest wheelbase and highest load rating, was the most powerful, fastest and best equipped of any model available at the time.

1989 Toyota Land Cruiser HD pickup

I’ve owned a couple of four-wheel-drive pre-Tacoma, Toyota trucks and loved them. They worked hard and were worked very hard. I cannot imagine how rugged and capable this Land Cruiser is by comparison.

1966 Hino Contessa 1300S

This is a 1966 Hino Contessa 1300S. What is a Hino? The company could actually be traced as far back as 1910 but, summed up, in 1942 the new Hino Heavy Industry Co., Ltd. branched off from Diesel Motor Industry Co., Ltd. which, incidentally, later became Isuzu. Initially, Hino produced only heavy duty trucks, buses and diesel engines.

1966 Hino Contessa 1300S

In 1953, Hino contracted with Renault to build their 4CV and cleverly rebadged it “Hino Renault 4CV”. By 1961, Hino was building its own car, the Contessa 900, and truck derivative called Briska. They were humble designs. Then, Italian stylist Giovanni Michelotti redesigned the 1964 Contessa and its rear-mounted engine was enlarged to a 1,300 cc four-cylinder. Plans were even made to import the car to the U.S.

1966 Hino Contessa 1300S

In 1967, Toyota acquired Hino and not only were its exportation plans cancelled but so was the passenger car and truck line. Hino finally made it into the U.S. (in heavy-duty form) and now has 200 dealers nationwide. This beautifully preserved 1966 Contessa, however, is the only Coupe known to currently exist in the U.S.


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