These next two are from Subaru. They are wild and it’s hard not to look at them and think of the fun times they’ve facilitated.

1970 Subaru 360 Van

This second-generation 1970 Subaru 360 Van is also known as the Sambar. The first-generation, introduced in 1961, was the first Kei class truck, also called Keitora. Government mandates stipulate size and engine displacement for Kei class vehicles which is why they are tiny.

1970 Subaru 360 Van

If you think the word “tiny” is hyperbole, compare it to the pint-sized first-generation Honda Civic sitting next to it. The owner said he’s had five adults in it.

1970 Subaru 360 Van

Less a feat of space than strength, this little van powered its rear wheels with a rear-mounted, air-cooled, two-stroke, two-cylinder engine that produced 25 hp. Admittedly, his upgrades have boosted output to an unverified 33.5 hp.

1971 Subaru 360 convertible

I’m guessing this car experiences a bit of body flex. It’s a 1971 Subaru 360 convertible, not to be confused with the standard convertible which had doors and sides, and more of a large canvas sunroof than a traditional folding convertible top.

1971 Subaru 360 convertible

According to a member of the Subaru 360 Drivers Club, this is one of reportedly as few as 24 to 30 of these converted convertibles made in the likeness of the Fiat Jolly. As the story goes, Subaru had contracted with a coach builder in California to make the alterations. They supposedly didn’t pay their bill, at which time the cars were confiscated and auctioned.

1971 Subaru 360 convertible

The 360 Convertible used the same engine as the the Sambar 360 Van, actually it’s the other way around since the van was built on the car’s platform. The name 360 derives from the government mandated engine displacement cap in cubic centimeters, even though the engine displaces 356 cc.


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