picture postNumber sold = 30 – 5 + 25

2005 Maserati MC12 Stradale


2005 Maserati MC12

After nearly four decades without an international championship to its name, Maserati chose to break that streak with a new model, the MC12. Because FIA GT Championship regulations required a minimum of 25 road-going versions, a mega car was born.

2005 Maserati MC12

At $810,000, mega car is an acceptable label by me. That’s $810,000 for one unit, not a multi-pack. In 2004, Maserati produced only 30 examples, however, five were destined to be retained by the company.

2005 Maserati MC12

Despite its lofty price tag, all 2004 models were sold on pre-order. In fact, demand was so high that another 25 units, including this particular car, were produced for 2005. Those straked outlets on the hood are exhausts for its forward-mounted radiators.

2005 Maserati MC12

The MC12 is a long-tail coupe-spider. Yes, the roof is a one-piece removable panel and that snorkel at the roof’s tail end is an intake for the engine compartment. It probably pipes the cabin with glorious sounds from its 6.0-liter V12, without the top.

2005 Maserati MC12

The MC12 was actually based on Ferrari’s Enzo, although its wheelbase is half a foot longer. For aerodynamic reasons, it’s almost one and a half feet longer, overall. Also up were width and height, by roughly 2.5 inches. (The latter due to the snorkel.)

2005 Maserati MC12

By this point, the museum’s director came out to meet me and granted better access, which was actually unnerving. When he reminded me its value exceeded $1 million (this is circa 2012) I started to sweat. Yet, I carried on as though coming into contact with million dollar objects was quite normal for me. [Cough.]

2005 Maserati MC12

Ferrari provided more than parts and a chassis, the engine was derived from Enzo as well. The Maserati-spec 6.0-liter V12 produced 620 hp. Weighing 2,943 pounds, the MC12 achieved 60 mph in 3.8 seconds, the quarter mile in 11.3 and a top speed of 205.

2005 Maserati MC12

Then I was signaled to open it up. Anxious just to experience the mega car’s door handle, I reached out trembling and I pondered the cost of a ding or a scratch or a tear. I opted to take the interior shots without fully entering the cabin. Crazy? Possibly, but I was novice and the day ended without incident.

2005 Maserati MC12

To be honest, the interior didn’t really scream $810,000 car. Not even $100,000 car. Granted I don’t have sufficient exposure to mega cars to discern value on that scale but some of the switchgear looks pretty… I gotta say it, low rent.

2005 Maserati MC12

One thing’s for sure, this particular MC12 was regularly used. According to my guide (circa 2012), it belonged to one of the owners of the museum which, unfortunately closed up shop only two weeks after my visit.